Gustav Stickley Furniture Arts & Crafts Furniture Mission Oak Furniture - Reproductions and Antiques
Specializing in the works of D`Arcy Gaw, Rohlfs, L. &. J.G. Stickley, Harvey Ellis, Greene & Greene, Gustav Stickley, Limbert, Roycroft and Dirk Van Erp.  Custom reproductions and antiques.
Unique Arts and Crafts period eleven drawer highboy dresser chest with Macmurdo feet and heart cut out design Stickley era

Unique Arts and Crafts period eleven drawer highboy dresser/chest with Macmurdo feet and heart cut-out design in the back-splash joining two small drawers above the top with a shelf supported by to shaped corels. Quality original hardware, fine original finish with minor touch up. Overall excellent condition, the case is very tight and the drawers all slide smoothly. Many of the elements of this chest, such as the shaped Macmurdo feet, heart cut out design, multiple drawers, corbels, quartered oak on the drawer sides and four of the eleven drawers with functional locks are significantly more labor intensive and costly to produce.



Product ID: #1500

*SOLD*

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Front view.

Front view.

Detail upper drawers, corbel supported shelf and heart shaped cut out design.

Detail upper drawers, corbel supported shelf and heart shaped cut out design.

Detail hardware.

Detail hardware.

Drawer construction detail, early machine dovetail joinery. Not a typical machine made drawer joint used by all of the major Arts and Crafts furniture manufacturers after the very early period when hand dovetail joinery was performed. The circular drawer joint is known as a Knapp joint or commonly the half moon, pin and scallop or scallop and dowel.   Charles B. Knapp of Waterloo, Wisconsin patented his first machine in 1867, a later version revolutionized furniture drawer construction.  It is generally considered that it was no longer used after 1900 when machinery was developed that produced joinery that resembled the preferred hand dovetailed joint. Note the uncommon use of the more expensive fine quarter sawed white oak in the sides of the drawers.

Drawer construction detail, early machine dovetail joinery. Not a typical machine made drawer joint used by all of the major Arts and Crafts furniture manufacturers after the very early period when hand dovetail joinery was performed. The circular drawer joint is known as a Knapp joint or commonly the half moon, pin and scallop or scallop and dowel. Charles B. Knapp of Waterloo, Wisconsin patented his first machine in 1867, a later version revolutionized furniture drawer construction. It is generally considered that it was no longer used after 1900 when machinery was developed that produced joinery that resembled the preferred hand dovetailed joint. Note the uncommon use of the more expensive fine quarter sawed white oak in the sides of the drawers.

Escutcheon

Escutcheon